2017 Nursing Annual Report

Stephanie King, RN, understands the importance of a smile and gentle touch, taking time to sit with patient Sarah Ohnemus.

A home away from home

Few things are scarier than having a child with a serious illness or injury. Fear and exhaustion contribute to unimaginable stress and anxiety. Our pediatric inpatient unit creates a home-away-from home environment so parents may focus on their child's recovery. Our nurses are part of a multidisciplinary team providing pediatric care and services. Together, they provide high-quality care to the patient and offer support to the parents and family. Because of their specialized pediatric skills, nurses help evaluate children's needs and care based on their illness. As an advocate, nurses establish trust with their young patients and connect with them at many different age levels.

Whether children are in the hospital recuperating from surgery or an illness, they experience many emotions. We offer several services to help our pediatric patients cope with the challenges of being in the hospital. The nursing staff coordinates visits with child life specialists who provide emotional support and play games with the patients; music and pet therapy services are also available.

Our pediatric nurses also look at the big picture to see how they can make the unit a healing environment with family-friendly touches. By partnering with many organizations, the nursing staff schedule daily activities so children can just be children. It is also very common to see celebrities; sports mascots, like Sluggerrr and KC Wolf; and loveable characters, like Cookie Monster, visiting with patients. Thanks to the generosity of several donors, the pediatric unit helps families relax and recharge by providing complimentary dinners and massages to parents.

This type of specialized, compassionate care is why our pediatric inpatient unit averaged above the 90th percentile in patient satisfaction during the 2017 fiscal year.

Press Ganey

The following patient care areas scored above the 90th percentile in patient satisfaction for fiscal year 2017:

  • Acute Rehabilitation Unit
  • Burn ICU/Burnett Burn Center
  • Cardiac ICU
  • Cardiothoracic Surgery ICU
  • Cardiothoracic Surgery Progressive Care
  • Cardiovascular Treatment and Recovery/Cath Lab
  • Indian Creek Inpatient Unit
  • Neuroscience and ENT ICU
  • Pediatrics/Pediatrics ICU
  • Surgical ICU
  • Unit 42, Hematology and Oncology
  • Unit 61, Medical Surgical ICU
  • Unit 62, Medical Telemetry
  • Unit 63, Medical Transplant ICU
  • Unit 64, Organ Transplant and Renal
  • Unit 65, Medical ICU

Natalie Eberle, RN, provides compassionate care at the bedside. She, along with Shelby Yates, RN, electrophysiology lab, and Christina Blackshire, RN, cath lab, are part of the nursing team who takes care of our patients before and after their cardiac procedure. Teamwork, along with a focus on treating each patient as an individual, ensures superior outcomes and more satisfied patients.

High-performance care through teamwork

For our patients who need a heart catheterization, even a scheduled or routine electrophysiology procedure, it is no doubt a scary experience. Our nursing teams provide exceptional patient care from the time of intake to discharge and beyond.

In our cardiovascular treatment and recovery unit, nurses help patients alleviate the fear and uncertainty of what to expect during the procedure. Because of their thorough knowledge of cardiac diseases, they build trusting relationships with their patients and families. They help patients understand what health problems might be contributing to their current situation and provide a detailed explanation of the cardiac procedure and recovery time.

The patient is then taken to the cath lab, where the cardiac team will perform a procedure to diagnose and/or treat the abnormality. Part of the team includes nurses with advanced, critical care skills who help deliver an extraordinary range of lifesaving cardiac interventions to patients. They manage complex situations in a high-tech environment while always bringing the art of nursing to life in their support to the patient and family.

Together, these nursing teams help manage our patients' postprocedural cardiac recovery by providing prompt attention and compassionate care. They give discharge instructions to the patient and the family, emphasizing medication compliance and therapeutic lifestyle changes, including smoking cessation, dietary changes and exercise. Because of our nurses' dedication, our patients receive advanced care in an environment designed for healing and comfort.

Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems survey, also known as HCAHPS

The following patient care areas scored above the 90th percentile in patient satisfaction for fiscal year 2017:

  • Burn ICU/Burnett Burn Center
  • Cardiac Family Medicine and Progressive Care Unit
  • Cardiothoracic Surgery ICU
  • Cardiothoracic Surgery Progressive Care
  • Cardiovascular Progressive Care
  • Cardiovascular Treatment and Recovery/Cath Lab
  • Indian Creek Inpatient Unit
  • Neuroscience and ENT ICU
  • Surgical ICU
  • Unit 42, Hematology and Oncology
  • Unit 43, Orthopedics
  • Unit 61, Medical Surgical ICU
  • Unit 62, Medical Telemetry
  • Unit 63, Medical Transplant ICU

Micki Miller, RN, trauma and burn case manager, assists a patient with a new wheelchair, made possible by the health system's STAR Fund grant program.

Grant provides wheelchairs to patients

After their discharge, sometimes our patients must stay off their feet, especially if they have been treated for a leg or foot injury. Our dedicated trauma case managers make sure our patients have their medications and supplies before they leave the hospital. They assess their needs and advocate for additional resources for our patients in need, as some patients may not have the resources to rent supplies from a medical equipment store.

Through the health system's STAR Fund grant program, our trauma case managers submitted a grant to purchase medical equipment for our patients in need. The STAR Fund grant program is funded by health system employees through our Employee Giving program. This program assists nurses in meeting and exceeding the unique needs and wishes of our patients across the health system.


Halie Horn, RN, and her father Henry, chief of police, Kansas City, Kansas Public Schools.

Father's care inspires daughter to become a nurse

When Henry Horn received a liver transplant in 2014, his daughter, Halie, was just entering college. As she walked the hallways in the Transplant ICU, Halie was in awe of the exceptional care and service provided by our nursing staff and team.

Just this past year, Henry, who is chief of police for the Kansas City, Kansas Public Schools, was back in the hospital to receive a kidney transplant. Halie was once again walking the halls of the Transplant ICU, but this time as a nurse on the unit. After her father's first transplant, she knew critical care nursing was to be her calling. She now works with the same nursing team who provided compassionate care and exceptional service to her father during his first transplant. Halie is also an invaluable resource to families who need emotional support in caring for their loved ones who undergo transplant surgeries.


Kate Scaletty, RN, adjusts an Angel Eye camera in the NICU.

Angel Eyes watching over NICU babies

As baby Charlie lay in her crib in our Neonatal ICU, her father was watching her 7,000 miles away in Kuwait. He simply logged in to a live NICU feed on a laptop and watched his daughter in amazement. Our new Angel Eye video system gives parents the ability to watch their premature babies any time of day, even when they are half a world away.

Our nurses help parents sign up for a family account shortly after their baby is admitted to the NICU. This interactive system allows nurses to chat with parents to let them know about daily milestones any time of the day. They provide personalized care to the families by positioning the cameras so parents can watch their babies sleep or view a special activity or event, such as the baby's first bath.

The internet-based program is available in 24 NICU rooms. The password-protected system allows parents, grandparents and other family members and friends to watch the NICU babies on smartphones, laptops and other devices. Our hospital is the first in Kansas City with the Angel Eye system. A gift from the Kansas City Royals Charities provided the funding for the online system.