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#GetYourPinkOn

Where you get your mammogram matters. And the same goes for where you get your cancer treatment. Learn more about cancer care at The University of Kansas Cancer Center.

Supporting awareness is easy. Pick up a free yard sign from any of our cancer treatment centers beginning October 2. Take a photo of the sign in your yard. Post the photo to Facebook and tag The University of Kansas Health System and use #getyourpinkon.

Where you get your mammogram matters 

Breast Screening Guidelines

About one in eight women will develop breast cancer over her lifetime. In fact, in the United States, a woman receives a breast cancer diagnosis every 2 minutes.

  • The University of Kansas Health System believes mammograms should start at age 40. Learn why.

For those who are diagnosed, early detection provides the best outcomes and saves lives. With the right technology and the right imaging experts, breast cancer is detectable even at its earliest stage, when it’s 98% curable. Learn more about mammogram and screening options.

To schedule an appointment, call 913-588-1227.

The facts

    No. 2Breast cancer is the most common cancer among American women after skin cancer.
 
    MenWomen aren't alone. About 2,600 new cases of invasive breast cancer cases will be diagnosed in men this year.


    99 percentNearly 99% of women with stage I breast cancer survive 5 years or more.

 


The easiest way to detect breast cancer early is by taking an active role in your breast health and making time for your annual mammogram.

Get checked

The American College of Radiology and Society of Breast Imaging firmly believe mammograms should start at age 40. These recommendations are for women with average risk for developing breast cancer. Likewise, The University of Kansas Health System also believes mammograms should begin at age 40, despite recent changes in some organizations' guidelines. Talk with your doctor to determine when to get screened and how often.

Your risk for breast cancer can change over time, due to factors such as aging or lifestyle. Simply being female is the primary risk factor for developing the disease. Other risk factors include:

  • Aging
  • Inherited genetic mutations, such as BRCA1 and BRCA2
  • Family history of breast cancer
  • Starting menstrual cycle before age 12
  • Personal history of breast cancer
  • Race and ethnicity
  • Denseness of breast tissue
  • History of fibroids or other benign breast conditions

Now is the perfect time to begin managing your breast health. Share the facts and risk factors associated with breast cancer and take a proactive approach to understanding your risk for developing the disease.

To schedule an appointment, call 913-588-1227.