4 Things the Galaxy Should Know About Skin Cancer

May 04, 2016

No matter what type of environment you live in, skin cancer is a powerful force that affects the lives of thousands of people. It is the most common form of cancer in the United States.

Since May is Skin Cancer Awareness Month AND May 4th is an unofficial "May the 4th Be with You" holiday, making this the perfect time for...

The 4 Things the Galaxy Should Know About Skin Cancer

No matter what type of environment you live in, skin cancer is a powerful force that affects the lives of thousands of people. It is the most common form of cancer in the United States.In 2012, 67,753 people in the U.S. were diagnosed with melanomas of the skin, including 39,673 men and 28,080 women.

I That's No Mole

Not all skin cancers look the same. Be on the lookout for signs of melanoma. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend using the A-E method when evaluating a mole.

  • Asymmetrical
    Does the mole or spot have an irregular shape with two parts that look very different?
  • Border
    Is the border irregular or jagged?
  • Color
    Is the color uneven?
  • Diameter
    Is the mole of spot larger than the size of a pea?
  • Evolving
    Has the mole or spot changed during the few weeks or months?

II Avoid Planets with Two Suns

You got us. That's a Star Wars reference. But, most cases of skin cancer are caused by ultraviolet rays from the sun (or two, if you live on certain desert plants). Be sure to cover arms and lets with long clothing or use a sunscreen with a high SPF rating. Hats and sunglasses are also a must.

III "I Am Your Father"

Know your family history. According to the CDC, people who have a close relative with a specific type of skin cancer called melanoma may be at greater risk of developing the disease.

IV "I Have a Bad Feeling About This."

Luke Skywalker isn't the only one who should pay attention to his/her/their intuition. If an area of skin looks or feels problematic - painful to the touch or very sensitive - get it checked by a doctor.

 

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